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  • 3 months ago
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  • #jordan #jordan future #Michael Jordan
  • 3 months ago
  • 181

Zim sitting is the way he comes back to mind, for me. Like a few other old coaches, he had converted clubhouse silence and immobility—elbows on knees, hands folded, head aimed forward and downward, lips zipped—into something like a regional religious practice.

Roger Angell on Yankee legend Don Zimmer, who died yesterday at eighty-three: http://nyr.kr/1mgmkxg (via newyorker)
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  • 3 months ago
  • 57
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  • 3 months ago
  • 132

Some people see his interventions as a sign of trouble—if hip-hop were healthy, would it need a defender, much less a white one from Chevy Chase?

Andrew Marantz profiles Peter Rosenberg, one of the most influential voices in hip-hop (subscription required): http://nyr.kr/1pEIJIB (via newyorker)

Hip-hop X newyorker

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  • #writing #written word #hip-hop
  • 5 months ago
  • 79

There was a moment. It was a Wednesday night in early February. A hellacious winter storm had rendered downtown Cleveland even more of a ghost town than it typically is during such a time, save for the 10,000 or so fans who piled into Quicken Loans Arena in hopes that their team, the Cavaliers, would snap what was a 21-game losing streak. The Indiana Pacers were in town. Danny Granger was a star in the making; Paul George was coming off of the bench; Tyler Hansbrough, Jeff Foster and Josh McRoberts were all receiving key minutes. Having lost the previous two games by 16 and 27 points, respectively, the Cleveland Cavaliers were somehow winning.

As the fourth quarter ticked away, fans rallied, standing and shouting as a means of encouragement. Byron Scott stood by — patiently. Clad in a dark grey suit and extra-wide grey and white-striped tie, his arms were crossed as he looked on. His team — and what a team it was — was attempting to hold on. As J.J. Hickson and Antawn Jamison both missed mid-range jump shots, however, the Pacers would regain the lead.

With 27 seconds remaining, Scott drew up a play that would, in an ideal world, put his team on top with nothing but a prayer left for the opposition. Players scurried about as the official handed the ball to Jamison for the inbounds pass. The ball would wind up in the hands of the player who was called upon to save the day. Unfortunately for Cleveland, that player was a 35-year old Anthony Parker who would proceed to lob a five-foot floater off of the back of the rim as guys named Christian Eyenga, Samardo Samuels and Manny Harris were watching from the team’s bench. The Q went silent as the Cavs would drop their 22nd straight contest despite the pleas from fans toting signs that begged for the alternative. They would go on to lose four more before pulling out an overtime thriller.

How we didn’t see this train barreling down the tracks — one where Anthony Parker is to ever play the role of hero — I’ll never quite understand.

My contribution to an SI.com column which relives the Cleveland Cavaliers’ 26-game losing streak of 2010-11.
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  • 6 months ago
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